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Beginning on 1 January 2020, all vessels worldwide will only be able to refuel using fuel with a maximum sulphur content of 0.5 percent – this is the requirement of the global fuel guideline known as IMO2020. As of 1 March, no vessel will be permitted to have on board any fuel with a high sulphur content. Only ships with exhaust gas cleaning systems will be excluded. In order to be compliant at the turn of the year and to consume their remaining heavy fuel oil in time, shipping companies are already having to make a number of preparations. This is both expensive and time-consuming.

The so-called IMO2020 regulation will entail a radical change for the entire shipping industry. Transitioning from fuel with a sulphur content of 3.5 percent to low-sulphur fuel oil will be a complex task. “It’s not about simply flipping a switch at the turn of the year, as every single ship will have to be closely examined to determine the best possible type of change depending on its design,” says Richard von Berlepsch, Managing Director Fleet Management at Hapag-Lloyd. “That’s why a large number of Hapag-Lloyd departments connected to fleet operations are currently working on this issue.”

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Almost £1 million in Government funding will be spent cutting deaths in the UK’s most dangerous industry, according to Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani.

The announcement was made during a meeting with safety experts and coastal MPs that an additional £700,000 will be provided to give more fishermen potentially lifesaving training. Increasing safety on fishing vessels is one of the priorities of the Maritime Safety Action Plan, which was published by the Department for Transport on 1st July.

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The 2019 meeting of the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) opened on Tuesday, 9 July 2019, at UN Headquarters in New York. In the morning, the opening session focused on progress in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) four years after implementation started. This was followed by a session on progress, gaps, and obstacles in leaving no one behind. In the afternoon, a review of SDG implementation and interrelations among goals took place, focussing on a discussion on SDG 4 (quality education).

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It is true that shipping, along with aviation, is probably the most difficult sector in transport to fully decarbonise. One would assume that the EU is running discussions at high speed to bring the emissions of shipping, one of the largest greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting sectors of the global economy, down as fast as possible. Quite the opposite is the case though, with shipping gaining only very little attention in European climate policy. One directive including some points on sustainable shipping is the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive, which states that “Member States shall ensure that the need for shore-side electricity supply for inland waterway vessels (…) and inland ports is assessed in their national policy frameworks.”[ii], which doesn’t set any binding target. Apart from that, NAIADES II, an EU-led project, aims to facilitate a modal shift in transport from road to sea, for many reasons, including environmental ones.

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