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On the eve of the latest round of UN ship climate negotiations at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London, a new report published by Seas at Risk and Transport & Environment maintains slower ship speeds would massively reduce the damage shipping is causing to human health, nature and the climate.

The report describes how a 20% reduction in ship speed would reduce underwater noise pollution by 66%, and the chance of a fatal collision between a ship and a whale by 78%. Both noise and whale strikes are having a serious impact on the health of the marine environment.

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More people than ever are aware that the giant ships carrying 80% of global trade are also giant polluters. Green MEP Bas Eickhout argues that regulators face a choice between real and fake CO2 regulations for shipping at UN negotiations next week.

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Saudi Arabia will host an international conference between Nov. 5 and 8 titled “Sustainable Marine Development Towards 2030 and Beyond,” organized by the Public Transport Authority (PTA) in partnership with the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

It will take place at the Jeddah Hilton Hotel and will be attended by Dr. Rumaih Al-Rumaih, chairman of the PTA, Kitack Lim, secretary-general of the IMO, members of the organization and leaders of the maritime sector in the Kingdom.

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The head of the Pacific Community says the region is on the back foot when it comes to confronting what he calls the "double-headed" crisis of climate change and non-communicable diseases.

Colin Tukuitonga said climate change was affecting fish stocks and crops, which was increasingly driving communities to eat fatty processed foods like corned beef and noodles.

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